Kyphoplasty

I forgot to post an update after the kyphoplasty.  It wasn’t as much fun as I thought it would be!  Since I’ve been getting Zometa for years, my bones are very hard.  The neurosurgeon wasn’t used to seeing this with myeloma patients, whose bones are usually a lot softer than mine are.  I remembered that, when I was first diagnosed in 2003, the doctor who performed my first bone marrow biopsy remarked about how soft the bone was.

Out came the mallet and a tool that I was told resembles a nail.  I could feel and hear the sounds of the mallet hitting the “nail.”   I felt as though I was in one of those “Saw” movies. I was awake during the procedure.  That’s just how it’s done.  I had fentanyl pushed through my IV whenever the pain and torture of it was more than I could handle.  They also used versed for sedation.

After gaining access to the interior of the L5, the doctor took some marrow to be biopsied.  Next, they performed a radio frequency ablation of the marrow to kill it (and any myeloma in there).  Finally, the injection of the cement was done.

For a long while after the kyphoplasty, I had nerve pain (think sciatica), which is finally subsiding. It took some weeks for me to fully recover for that reason.  I’m really glad it’s over, and I hope I never have to do it again.

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