Sponsafier NASCAR design contest

Congratulations! Your support for “The Survivor” has pushed the car ahead into the semi-final round of the Sponsafier NASCAR design contest!

“The Survivor” is a myeloma awareness racecar designed by patient Keith May and the IMF, and it is one of only 10 cars (out of over 3,100 submitted!) to advance to the semi-final round in the “Cause” category! Our cause, of course, is “beating myeloma to the finish line,” as Keith has written on the car.

Our spot in the semi-final round is an exciting chance for all myeloma supporters to be in the driver’s seat as we raise awareness of myeloma and the International Myeloma Foundation.

To help “The Survivor” forge ahead into the finals, please vote every day for the next 10 days by logging onto http://nascar.myeloma.org and simply clicking the “vote” button! It takes only 30 seconds, and you won’t have to enter an email address or any personal information!

The winning entry will be built as a full sized car, showcased at a NASCAR race, and your votes can help push us across the finish line!

The messages on the car are simple: “Beat myeloma to the finish line,” and simply “beat cancer.” What better way to get there than by racing?

Visit http://nascar.myeloma.org to cast your vote once per day! And spread the word! Voting is open until September 23.

Here she is…

This is the new doggie.  I don’t have a name for her yet, so any suggestions are welcome. Thanks to the Collie Rescue of the Carolinas for bringing her to me.

She’s a sweet pup.  I’m not sure how old she is, but the vet paperwork says “> 8.”  She seems to be deaf, so it’s ok that I don’t have a name for her yet.  She does respond to hand gestures, which is pretty cool.   I can motion to her to come to me, and she does!

My new collie girl

Here’s a picture I took yesterday.  I think she’s feeling safe and secure here.  She took over my bed!

My collie

I’m still considering names, but her inability to hear me call her means there’s no rush.  She’s quite a pistol.  She’s getting into the garbage and eating cat food. We walk every night, when it cools down a bit,  and we’re both enjoying that.  Once the temperature gets a little cooler, we’ll start going to the park to walk.  Buddy used to love that, and I hope the new doggie loves going there, too.

Help get Toyota racing to beat myeloma

A reader just told me about this. How cool! I’m going to go vote for the “Myeloma Survivor” right now! You can vote every 24 hours.
http://www.sponsafier.com/#/gallery/view/367247

I thought you may be interested to know that the International Myeloma Foundation has entered a Toyota racecar design in a contest called Sponsafier. The winning entry will be built as a full sized car, and your votes can help push myeloma awareness across the finish line.

The idea and the car design come from a myeloma patient in Normal, Illinois. Keith May has covered the car with slogans to raise awareness of myeloma, and the work being done to beat it. The IMF has named the car “The survivor.”

“Survivor” is one of several hundred entries in the Sponsafier contest. Some entries are just artistic designs and some like Keith’s support a cause. For the next 12 days, please log onto nascar.myeloma.org to vote for Keith’s design. Please also ask your friends, families and colleagues to vote too.

This is a great opportunity to educate a new audience about myeloma and blood cancers, the advances that have been made in treatment and the challenges that lie ahead.

Incidence of myeloma by country

Paula just added an interesting post here:

http://feresaknit.wordpress.com/2010/08/04/whys-africa-not-red/

Our toxic environments have a lot to do with why we got myeloma. (see http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090813142148.htm)

From the maps linked in Paula’s blog, you can see that the industrialized countries have more MM in their populations.

There’s some information to be found on myeloma cancer clusters by googling:

http://www.google.com/#hl=en&q=meyloma+cancer+clusters&aq=f&aqi=m1&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=&pbx=1&fp=ea2cd8eab02d18af

I’ve been really lazy about posting these days.  There’s a lot going on.

Blogs and more blogs

We’ve been working on creating more planets like the Myeloma Planet.  The next two to be launched will be the Leukemia and Lymphoma Planets.  If you have (or someone you know has) a blog about their leukemia or lymphoma experiences, please click on the Contact Tab and let me know about it.  We’ll add it to the feeds.

Here’s some news from the garden!

I have one tomato that’s almost ready to be picked, there are some jalapenos and one broccoli plant that’s showing signs of actually becoming broccoli.  Green beans are still a bit off in the future, as are the squash.  There’s been loads of rain and lots of hot sun.

Test results and other stuff

I had blood drawn on 6/3, and got the results back today.

Test: Result (Normal Range)

IGG: 455 (600-1700)
IGM: 34 (35-290)
IGA: 466 (40-400)

This is from last time, so you can see there’s not much change!

IGG: 466 (600-1700)
IGM: 31 (35-290)
IGA: 408 (40-400)

I found a new web site that I’m still checking out.  It has details about lab tests and other info.
http://www.clinlabnavigator.com/

Anyway, the doc says I’m still smoldering!

I was at Five Points Pet Resort a couple of weeks ago, where this green-winged macaw engaged us.  He has a lot of personality!

StoryCorps/NPR Broadcast on Multiple Myeloma

From a reader:

I’m writing from StoryCorps, America’s largest nonprofit national
oral history project. Because our broadcast this morning on NPR talks
about the experience of a family affected by multiple myeloma, I
thought it might be worth sharing with your readers. Please have a
listen!
Sy Saliba talks to his daughter, Yvette, about her mother, Pat, who
passed away from multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer, in 2005.
http://bit.ly/93jYOB

StoryCorps is an independent nonprofit project whose mission is to
honor and celebrate one another’s lives through listening. Since 2003,
tens of thousands of people from across the country have interviewed
family and friends through StoryCorps. Each conversation is recorded
on a free CD to take home and share and is also archived for
generations to come at the Library of Congress.