Advice from a cat lady

If you have cats, you probably have one that refuses to use the litterbox.  Instead, he or she zeros in on the piles of laundry in the laundry room, any soft cushion on your best piece of furniture, or, God forbid, your bed.  You’ve tried everything, but nothing’s working for this kitty.  There’s no litter that will satisfy her.  You’ve added at least one litterbox to every room in the house.  What now?

The next thing you should do, is take the cat to the vet.  No, I’m not saying you need to have her euthanized!  Read on.  The vet needs to check your pet over thoroughly, to make sure he or she doesn’t have a urinary tract infection. If one is present, an antibiotic will be given, and you may see your pet’s litterbox habits improve.

However, the possibility remains that, as my vet put it, “it’s a behavioral problem.”  Maybe the cat is being stalked at the litterbox by his or her feline housemates?

Puppy training pads for cat There may not be much you can do about the situation.  Unfortunately, experts say that “inappropriate elimination” is the number one reason cats are surrendered to shelters, abandoned  and euthanized.

Before you give up your cat, try one more thing.  This worked for me, and we’ve had harmony in the house ever since.  No “accidents” either!

Try puppy training pads or the human version, referred to as “chux.”  Lay a few of them down in the area where you errant kitty is known to eliminate.  If your situation turns out to be like mine, you’ll find that the cat is now urinating and/or defecating on the pads instead of the carpet, clothes, sofa or bed.  I actually place the pads near the litterbox I want my cat to use, and she uses the pads there.  I will warn you that you can go through 4-6 pads a day, depending on your cat’s eating and drinking routine, but it’s well worth it.  The best thing about it is that the cleanup is fast and easy!  I just pick up the used pad and put another in its place!

You can actually buy the human version for less, if you shop around.  I find them for less than $20 per 100.

Latest Labs

The serum free light chains weren’t back yet when I got this. I don’t think about this stuff as much as I used to, so I probably won’t even call in to ask about it. I’ll wait for my next appointment in a couple of months to find out.

I had been seeing the doc every 4 months, but now it’s going to be every 3 months, due to a small increase in m-spike. The doc asked me if I want to start maintenance, but I said no. The m-spike was somewhere about 0.3 five years ago after I had my auto SCT.
Myeloma blood test results 2012 July

Puppy Mills in North Carolina

This was forwarded to me on the AAMC mailing list.

 

This is a picture of a puppy currently residing in a puppy mill in North Carolina. Under present state law, because she has “food, water and shelter” she cannot be rescued. Only when she is dead will she probably get out of this cage.
We are hoping (probably against hope) that the legislature might take some time away from passing a fracking bill, to consider legislation that would define the requirements of “food, shelter and water” a bit better than is pictured here, as well as require exercise and veterinary care.

Puppy Mills in North Carolina

If you agree that this is cruel and inhumane treatment, please let your legislators know. In Moore County, your state representative is Jamie Boles ( jamie.boles@ncleg.net ) and your state senator is Harris Blake ( Harris.Blake@ncleg.net ). You might also address comments to the Senator Pro Tem Phil Berger ( Phil.Berger@ncleg.net ) and Speaker of the House Thom Tillis ( Thom.Tillis@ncleg.net ).

There are a lot of animals in North Carolina that would appreciate your speaking up for them.

Post about new “Blood” study from Margaret’s blog

I wanted to share this link with my readers, because it’s an important discussion about cure vs control and other aspects of myeloma treatment or management.

http://margaret.healthblogs.org/2011/08/02/the-cure-versus-control-debate-a-new-blood-study/

Please read it and let me know what you think.  I’ve long thought I probably should have held off on treatment for as long as possible, and my post-SCT strategy is to stay treatment free for as long as possible. I expect to withhold treatment until symptoms affect QOL.